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Founded in 1979, October Gallery, in central London, exhibits innovative, contemporary art from around the world. For over 35 years, October Gallery has pioneered the development of the Transvangarde - the trans-cultural avant-garde.

Exhibitions


El Anatsui exhibits a new work at the 248th Summer Exhibition,
Royal Academy of Arts, London
13th June - 21st August, 2016

image: El Anatsui, Advocado Coconut Egg (ACE) 2016. Aluminium and copper wire 260 x 270 cm.
photo © Jonathan Greet

image: Romuald Hazoumè, Chouchou, 2013. Plastic, nylon and metal, 56 x 35 x 25 cm.

Current Exhibition

Govinda Sah 'Azad', Matter/Nothing/Matter, 2015.
Mixed media on canvas, 160 x 180 cm.
Govinda Sah ‘Azad’
BOUNDLESS POSSIBILITIES
19 May – 25 June 2016

October Gallery, London, presents Boundless Possibilities a solo exhibition by Govinda Sah 'Azad’, comprised of mixed media works on canvas.  

This summer’s exhibition marksSah’s third showing at October Gallery. Born in Nepal, where he studied Fine Arts at Tribhuvan University, Kathmandu, before completing his MFA at Wimbledon College of Arts, in 2008, Sah now lives and works in London.

Effortlessly balancing traditional eastern metaphysical insights about the nature of reality with visual realisations that are in accord with the latest formulations of contemporary western science, Govinda Sah imagines a cosmos of boundless possibilities. A painter of tempestuous skies and cosmic explosions, Sah is drawn towards the unknown, intuitively shaping a response to the question: How was the universe created? Sah cannot conceive a universe without logic and purpose and yet his impulse is to ‘seek the sacred’.

Pushing boundaries in his new work, Sah physically engages with the jute and wooden stretchers of his canvases, creating deep openings, minute holes and shaped frames. Whilst still retaining his intricate painterly skills, carefully textured layers of paint are combined with more three-dimensional objects such as beads and hair to bring the evolving cosmos out of the flat plane. Sah also incorporates the use of fire, drawing from the very inspiration of his works; light. Just as light consumes darkness, he allows a flame to take over his canvases, its smoke forming natural peaks that evoke turbulent skies. Glimpses of precise graphical lines are visible through the intricate layers as the artist’s fascination with space aesthetically engages both science and mathematics.  


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Forthcoming Exhibitions

Eddy Kamuanga Ilunga
Oubliez le passé et vous perdez les deux yeux, 2016.
Acrylic and oil on canvas, 200 x 200 cm.
Eddy Kamuanga Ilunga
Reconnaissance, 2016.
Acrylic and oil on canvas, 170 x 150 cm
EDDY KAMUANGA ILUNGA
First UK solo show
30 June – 30 July 2016

October Gallery, London, is pleased to announce its forthcoming exhibition of new works by Eddy Kamuanga Ilunga. This will be the artist’s first exhibition at the gallery, and his first solo exhibition in the United Kingdom. A private view will be held on 29th June.

Eddy Kamuanga Ilunga is one of the most exciting young artists working in Africa today. Born in the Democratic Republic of Congo in 1991, he trained at the Kinshasa Academy of Arts and has founded the dynamic Congolese art collective ‘M’Pongo’, representative of the creative vibrancy to be found in modern Kinshasa.

In his present series ‘Mangbetu’, Kamuanga Ilunga has explored the predicament of the Mangbetu people, an ethnic group of warrior extraction in the DRC, whose culture is being threatened by a desire to modernise. The DRC is the world’s largest exporter of coltan, a raw material used in computer chips and mobile phones, and Kamuanga Ilunga pays equal reference to both this modern industry and the traditional culture of the Mangbetu, bringing their vibrant fabrics, symbolic objects and daily rituals into confrontation with the digital imagery of the present day. His paintings possess a monumental quality that is both heroic and elegiac, with a striking and sophisticated interplay of intensity and emptiness, two and three dimensions, and Congolese pattern painted as European drapery.

Kamuanga Ilunga’s work has been exhibited across Africa, notably at DakArt; Biennale OFF Senegal in 2014, and made its London debut at the Saatchi Gallery’s Panagaea II in 2015. The enormous excitement around the 24-year-old artist at London’s 1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair in 2015 and at New York’s Armory Show in 2016 was compounded by an article in the FT’s How to Spend It, which employed his work ‘Lost’ to represent The Best of New York Armory 2016.



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Daniele Tamagni
Ngor, La Renaissance Africaine (detail), 2012.
Lambda C-Print, 80 x 57 cm.
DANIELE TAMAGNI
AND JAMES BARNOR
8 – 30 September 2016

This collaborative exhibition presents work by pioneering Ghanaian photographer James Barnor, and award winning Italian photographer Daniele Tamagni. Featuring Barnor’s analogue photographs of London’s growing multicultural metropolis during the ‘swinging 60s’ and Ghana in the 50s, along with new works by Tamagni of striking fashion sub cultures throughout contemporary Africa. This exhibition follows the launch of the publications: ‘Ever Young’, by James Barnor and ‘Fashion Tribes’, by Daniele Tamagni.

Daniele Tamagni, an Italian photographer, trained as an art historian before travelling worldwide to document colourful fashion subcultures. Shooting style in locations outside of the presumed fashion contexts such Brazzaville, Johannesburg, Nairobi and Dakar, Tamagni seeks and finds individualistic identity. In 2007 he won the Canon Young Photographer Award with a project about the Congolese dandys, Sapeurs of Brazzaville and in 2010 won the ICP, Infinity Award; fashion category.  Tamagni’s subjects are reflective of James Barnor’s models of the 60s with fashion aiding their nonchalant confidence.

James Barnor, born in Accra, Ghana in 1929, began, like many of his contemporaries on the continent, by setting up a studio which was visited by general public as well as dignitaries. Working for the Daily Graphic, as their first photojournalist, and Drum magazine, the influential anti-apartheid journal for lifestyle and politics, developed his career rapidly. After moving to the UK in 1959, he continued to work on commissions for Drum, in London, shooting multinational models for its covers. Barnor’s portraits depict the self-assurance and individualistic fashion trends that dominated.

Style dictated the identity of Londoners during the sixties but continues to do so in contemporary society. Tamagni shines light on the renaissance happening in developing economies and the power of fashion to push economic and cultural boundaries today.

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Most Recent Exhibitions

Sokari Douglas Camp, Blind Love and Grace, 2016.
Mild steel, acrylic paint, aluminium gold and copper leaf, 
278 x 203 x 135 cm.
Photo: Jonathan Greet
Sokari Douglas Camp, Blind Love and Grace, 2016.
Mild steel, acrylic paint, aluminium gold and copper leaf,
278 x 203 x 135 cm.

Photo: Jonathan Greet
Sokari Douglas Camp
PRIMAVERA
7 April - 14 May 2016

Internationally renowned sculptor, Sokari Douglas Camp, creates her works primarily in steel. Her often large-scale sculptures make frequent reference to her Nigerian roots, at the same time, encompassing contemporary international issues. Douglas Camp studied fine art at the Central School of Art and Design and the Royal College of Art. She has represented Britain and Nigeria in a number of exhibitions and has had more than 40 solo shows worldwide. Her work is in the permanent collections of the National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.; Setagaya Art Museum, Tokyo and the British Museum, London.

Primavera brings together major new sculptures which focus on the reinterpretation of familiar figures from the European classical tradition. The large work Europe supported by Africa and America, recreates and adapts an 18th century engraving by William Blake. This intricate composition features three female figures touching and supporting each other, dressed in contemporary clothing remnant of high fashion in Nigeria. The central figure holds a long wreath which grows into a fuel hose – the whole composition offers a wry commentary on social issues and their ramifications for wider environmental concerns. Other works reconfigure detailed scenes adapted from well-known Botticelli paintings, in which the instantly recognisable figures metamorphose into more modern icons of contemporary culture and society.

Douglas Camp is one of the winners of the memorial for Ken Saro-Wiwa in London, and was one of the shortlisted artists for the Fourth Plinth in 2003. She collaborated with Ground Force to create an African Garden for the British Museum, as part of Africa ‘05. In 2005, she was awarded a CBE in recognition of her services to art. Her critically acclaimed work Battle Bus travelled to Nigeria last year as part of Action Saro-Wiwa, a campaign to clean up the Niger Delta, eliciting nationwide support after having been held by local government officials.

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El Anatsui, Warrior, 2015. Aluminium and copper wire,
350 x 330 cm. photo: Jonathan Greet
El Anatsui, Breaking News, 2015. Aluminium and copper wire, 276 x 260 cm. photo: Jonathan Greet
El Anatsui
NEW WORKS
4 February - 2 April 2016

El Anatsui, recipient of the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement at the 56th Venice Biennale, is one of the most exciting international contemporary artists of our time.

Throughout a distinguished forty-year career as both sculptor and teacher – he was Professor of Sculpture and Departmental Head at the University of Nigeria, Nsukka – El Anatsui has addressed a vast range of social, political and historical concerns, and embraced an equally diverse range of media and processes. His installations have provoked wide international attention, with institutions and audiences fascinated by these sumptuous, mesmerising works made from thousands of aluminium bottle tops. During the Venice Biennale, in 2007, he transformed the facade of the Palazzo Fortuny by draping it in a shimmering wall sculpture. In 2010, two major touring shows of his work opened on opposite sides of the world: El Anatsui: When I Last Wrote to You About Africa at the Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto, Canada (organised by the Museum for African Art, New York) and A Fateful Journey: Africa in the Works of El Anatsui at the National Museum of Ethnology, Osaka, Japan. As part of the 2012 Paris Triennale, he transformed the entire facade of Le Palais Galleria, Musée de la Mode de la Ville de Paris with his striking work, Broken Bridge. In 2013, the Brooklyn Museum, New York, USA, exhibited the touring solo exhibition, Gravity and Grace: Monumental Works by El Anatsui and the Royal Academy of Arts, London, presented the artist with the prestigious Charles Wollaston Award for his work, TSIATSIA – searching for connection, 2013, which covered the entire facade of the RA building. In 2014, he was made an Honorary Royal Academician as well as elected into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

This exhibition will present a new body of work by the artist, that further explores the possibilities of the artist’s iconic bottle-top sculptures.


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Gerald Wilde, The Clown.
Gerald Wilde:
FROM THE ABYSS
27 November 2015 - 30 January 2016

October Gallery presents From the Abyss, an exhibition of Gerald Wilde’s paintings, comprising early wartime works of the 1940’s through to pieces collected from his final years in the late ‘70s and early ‘80s.

In 1979, October Gallery first opened its doors with an exhibition of Wilde’s work, and has since remained dedicated to bringing this major British artist of the 20th Century to the attention of a wider audience, in the firm belief that he has yet to achieve the full recognition he deserves. Taught by painter, Graham Sutherland and sculptor, Henry Moore, Wilde’s work was widely admired and respected by fellow artists Lucian Freud and Frank Auerbach and praised by critics such as John Berger, David Sylvester and William Feaver.

From the intensity of his early work, through to the liberation found in his "Pompeii" series and the more colourful paintings of his later years - his non-figurative enquiries into the workings of the mind - Wilde confronts us on both the abstract level and the level of symbols and dreams. If the tempestuous use of impasto in his early work draws us into the conflict-ridden spaces of his chaotic inner world, then he later balances us on the edge of that abyss, arm-in-arm with clowns, tightrope dancers and spacemen, teetering in eccentric orbits of their own creation. Following Wilde’s startling trajectory, we witness his journey from a place of nervous unease and angst to a calmer place of reconciliation and rest.  Wilde’s ‘clowns’ cast no shadows – illuminated, as they are, by an infinity of brilliant stars, as delicately they tumble, head over heels, through the inky distances of outer space.


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Aubrey Williams, Time and the Elements,
1985 (Olmec Maya series). Oil on canvas, 123 x 181 cm.
Aubrey Williams:
REALM OF THE SUN
8 October – 21 November 2015

October Gallery, London, will present an exhibition by Aubrey Williams, introducing works previously unseen.

Aubrey Williams' distinctive contribution to 20th century British art as a master of painterly abstraction is increasingly recognized; a contemporary of Alan Davie and Peter Lanyon, Williams’ work invites productive comparison but has yet to receive comparable attention.

Born in Georgetown, Guyana, in 1926, Williams’ early training as an agronomist took him to the north-west rainforest where he lived for two years among the indigenous Warrau people.  This proved to be a formative period of his life in which he, as he later said, 'started to understand what art really is.'



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Brion Gysin by Ira Cohen

Brion Gysin:
UNSEEN COLLABORATOR
2 July – 1August 2015
reopening
8th September – 3rd October 2015

October Gallery, London is pleased to present Unseen Collaborator, a solo exhibition of works by Brion Gysin. The exhibition will feature previously unseen drawings, paintings, photography and a film about the complex artist. Neo-calligrapher, master of line, multimedia revolutionary and cultural historian, Gysin’s experiences in New York, Tangier, Paris and London influenced his seminal artistic productions. William Burroughs called Gysin, ‘the only man I truly respect’.



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Wang Huangsheng
Moving Visions Series No.62, 2012.
Ink on paper, 70 x 70 cm.

Wang Huangsheng
UNBROKEN LINE
14 May – Now extended to 27 June

October Gallery will present the first solo show in London of Wang Huangsheng (b.1956, China), whose work is held in many international collections such as the V & A, London, Uffizi Gallery, Florence and the National Art Museum of China, Beijing. Wang Huangsheng, in addition to being a prominent artist, is also one of the most influential figures in the art world of China and the most important supporter of Chinese avant-garde art. He is currently the Director of the CAFA Museum in Beijing, a highly significant art space and former Director of the Guangdong Museum of Art.

As ink painting gains recognition in the west- with the recent exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Ink Art: Past as Present in Contemporary China and by the recognition of its influence on western artists from Robert Motherwell to Brice Marden - October Gallery will present the ink paintings of an artist whose works are alert to tradition yet at the same time resolutely contemporary. The exhibition will focus on Wang Huangsheng’s most recent works.

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October Gallery, 24 Old Gloucester Street, Bloomsbury, London WC1N 3AL Tel: + 44 (0)20 7242 7367 Fax: + 44 (0)20 7405 1851